Sung poignantly over a vocal drone, (Cory Klose) proved that even the most sentimental ballad can sound noble if put across with sincerity and unforced beauty.
— The Times of London, April 2018

With singing described as “poignant...with sincerity and unforced beauty” (The London Times), “elegant” (Cape Cod Times), and “emotionally devastating”  (Boston Music Intelligencer), Cory Klose is a sought-after soloist and ensemble singer in the United States. Highlights of Cory’s recent solo appearances include J.S. Bach’s Magnificat, Duruflé’s Requiem, Handel’s Messiah, and Vaughan Williams’ Five Mystical Songs. As a professional choral artist, Cory has appeared with many noted ensembles in the United States including Boston’s Handel and Haydn Society, Bach Collegium San Diego, Skylark, Kinnara Ensemble, The Crossing, Santa Fe Desert Chorale, True Concord, and The Thirteen. He can also be heard on many acclaimed choral recordings including Skylark’s 2019 GRAMMY® Award-nominated album “Seven Words from the Cross”. Cory resides in Atlanta, GA where he is a staff singer at The Cathedral of St. Philip and serves as the Executive Director of MINT.

PRESS QUOTES

“…the tender heartbreak of Frederick Buckley’s “Break It Gently, to My Mother,” with tenor Cory Klose — unforgettable.”
The Medford Transcript, December 2018

“…undeniably moving…”
MusicWeb International, March 2019

“Sung poignantly over a vocal drone, (Cory Klose) proved that even the most sentimental ballad can sound noble if put across with sincerity and unforced beauty.”
The Times of London, April 2018

“Perhaps the most deeply moving setting came from another early American composer, Frederick Buckley (1833-64), whose “Break It Gently, to My Mother,” sounding much like a Civil War ballad,
was sung elegantly by tenor Cory Klose.”
Cape Cod Times, March 2018

“The singing featured warm, consoling tone and clear but natural diction, particularly from the tenor soloist Cory Klose; again, quiet intensity informed an emotionally devastating performance.”
Boston Music Intelligencer, March 2018